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Historical Cities in Croatia

The City of Zadar


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The city of Zadar is a perfect blend of cultural and architectural heritage and all the amenities characteristic of a modern city. After having first been settled by the Illyrians in the 9th century B.C, the Greeks, Romans, Venetians and Austrians consecutively followed. They all knew the importance of the strategic position of the city and established buildings and monuments that today serve as part of the great cultural legacy found in Zadar.


Famous people like Alfred Hitchcock spent time in the city and were certainly charmed by the fabulous sunset that can be seen from Zadar’s sea promenade (Riva). The entire city, situated on a peninsula surrounded with walls, is a monument unto itself. Reserved for pedestrians, a visit to the historical center of Zadar will certainly transport you back a few centuries into the past. Zadar is very dynamic and has much to offer to its visitors, who come from all over the world to enjoy the many festivities and events that are held during the summer months. Its airport connects to the major European cities and a ferry serves as a connection to Ancona, Italy. It is situated just 30 km north of Pakostane, making Zadar a very attractive destination in Croatia and beyond. If you do not have a car, local buses offer a very easy alternative to getting to Zadar.

The City of Sibenik


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Sibenik, the oldest Croatian town on the Adriatic coast, is situated in a naturally protected harbor about 35 km to the south of Pakostane. It boasts a rich repository of Croatian culture. Serving as one of the master pieces of the Croatian renaissance, the St. James Cathedral is classified under the world heritage list of UNESCO. Its churches, fortifications, walls, palaces, plazas, museums and expositions make the city one of the most exemplary of Croatian art and culture.


Events such as the International Children Festival, the Medieval Fair, as well as many concerts during the summer further enhance the city’s value as an attraction for visitors. The National Park, Krka, is just a few kilometers upstream of the river and can be a very pleasant way to stroll through the city, the park and the picturesque ethno-village of Pakovo selo.

The City of Trogir


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The city of Trogir, which could be described as a large open air museum, is indeed a very touristic destination and fills the city with crowds of tourists during the summer. Considered as a jewel of the European civilization, the city houses numerous buildings, churches and palaces that have been created by some of the finest artists during a period stretching more than 2000 years. A magnificent example of the Romanesque style, the St Lawrence’s cathedral is considered to be one of the best architectural achievements in all of Croatia. It is no surprise that UNESCO registered the entire old town as a world heritage in 1997.


Trogir is situated about 100 km to the south of Pakostane and can be reached either by the highway or by the national road bordering the coast. Along the way visitors can see the beautiful town of Sibenik and Primosten. Local buses from Pakostane also service those cities. The airport of Split, actually located in Trogir, provides another option for travel to Pakostane.

The City of Split


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Split, the capital of Dalmatia, is a vibrantly modern Mediterranean city, dating back 1700 years. Numerous historical and cultural monuments, the famous palace of Diocleclian being among them, are registered under UNESCO’s world heritage list. Whether you stroll along the city’s river, wander the narrow streets or visit the Mestrovic galleria, Split is full of delightful surprises for all visitors.


International transportation to and from Split is made very convenient through an international airport that hosts flights for “low cost” airlines to major European cities, an international railway station as well as a ferry boat line to Italy. Local bus services from Pakostane, which is 135 km south of Split, run all day long and connect to all the main coastal cities. Pickup from the airport is available through Split taxi services.